From extensions to natural hair, the way Black women wear our crown tells a story of a million tales, especially when she decides to rock a fade penetrated with deep waves. Black History Month cannot be celebrated without acknowledging the multi-dimensional aspect of the Black woman.  

Our story and style is very intricate and detailed. We started to see more variety of hairstyles in the 1920’s. Starting with the flapper-esque styles to faux locs, we have over 100 years of transformation and evolution, which collided with Hip Hop. 

In the 1980’s, Hip Hop culture took Black style to the next level. With leather bombers, tracksuits, and women rocking short hairstyles, fades were taken to the next level, and women were following suit. However, it was the popularity of the durag that first created the trend of waves. It is said that the accessory became mainstream in 1979. 

 

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TSR Staff: La’Janeé @_lajanee_ _________________________________ TSRBeauty: From extensions to natural hair, the way a Black woman wears her crown tells a story of a million tales, especially when she decides to rock a fade penetrated with deep waves. _________________________________ Black History Month cannot be celebrated without acknowledging the multi-dimensional aspect of the Black woman. _________________________________ Through our femininity, we’re able to explore our freedom, while resting in our duality. _________________________________ The story of the Black woman and our style is very—read more at theshaderoom.com 📸: @zarleah @kendyltee @nellynelle19 @jenaemilyutley @myladyheiress

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Spearheaded by William J. Dowdy with ‘So Many Waves,’ according to The New York Times, they were used to keep hair in place. Thus, creating waves after it was taken off. The hair accessory, originally called “tie- down” was equivalent to a Black woman’s head scarf.

Even many women who opt out of the waves but still wear fades, there’s still freedom in that. With icons like Grace Jones rocking her high top fade and still owning her femininity, she inspired many women to do the same.

In a 2008 interview with Mail Online, Jones stated,

“I do change roles in life. I live that way. I go feminine. I go masculine. I am both, actually. I think the male side is a bit stronger in me, and I have to tone it down sometimes. I’m not like a normal woman. That’s for sure.”

 Some will say that the fade is a little masculine, and while that may be true, the femininity of a Black woman makes it fit perfectly. We cannot be put into a box.

So, when you see women rocking fades, wearing durags, and using the hashtag #WaveCheck, remember she’s honoring her freedom, and expressing her femininity, while being magical, all at the same time.